The Pregnant Waddle

Pre-Pregnancy Weight Just Around the Corner (It's Trying to Run and Hide)

Tuesday, May 24, 2005

Random geeky trivia follow-up post

Can anybody identify from whence "Sweets to the sweet" cometh? :)

9 Comments:

At 5:10 PM, Blogger Nate said...

No doubt from somewhere totally geeky, like Hamlet. (Sarcasm over the word "geek" being applied to things Shakespearian is intended but probably not coming through.)

 
At 8:15 AM, Blogger Jordana said...

Perhaps ... :)

 
At 1:27 PM, Blogger Nate said...

It would be totally geeky, however, for soembody to write a small bot to wander the internet in search of the answer question :)

 
At 3:15 PM, Anonymous Husbandlet said...

I know there's a reference to it in "The Little House in the Big Woods" (first in the little house on the prarie series). When Laura and co go into town the shop keeper gives both Laura and her anxt inducing big sister Mary candy heart's and Laura's has that quote on it, although I believe it uses 'for' instead of 'to'. Nate's Shakespeare idea is a good one though and I'll go out on a limb and guess "Tameing of the Shrew" though I'm probably dead wrong.

 
At 3:26 PM, Blogger Jordana said...

OK, wise guys, if you think it's Shakespeare, be more specific. Who says it, to whom, and under what circumstances?

Is bot-writing going on? :)

 
At 3:41 PM, Anonymous That other Jordana said...

My Shakespeare is rusty, but I think it comes from Hamlet and more specifically from Ophelia's funeral. I suppose I should go drag out the Pelican Shakespeare and check...hmmm...

 
At 5:02 PM, Anonymous peter said...

It is indeed Hamlet's favorite mother Gertrude, speaking as she throws flowers on Ophelia's grave.

Was Ophelia diabetic? Did Gertrude intend to sweeten her to death? Would this explain why Hamlet wanted Ophelia to get herself to the more austere environment of a nunnery?

 
At 5:13 PM, Blogger Jordana said...

Very good!

I think Peter's interpretation is not without textual grounds ... Note that in the "Get thee to a nunnery!" scene, Ophelia uses the word "sweet" no less than three times, and reflects that she once "sucked the honey of [Hamlet's] music vows" (III.i.148). I sense a definite sugar addiction there. One wonders what Ophelia would have made of Glucola.

 
At 2:28 AM, Blogger Nate said...

I'd love to note that, but I can't get my bot to work. Sigh.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home